s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 3 of 10 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month!
Already a subscriber?
You've read 6 of 10 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month!
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Continue reading with unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month!
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Get unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month, and support community journalism!
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Get unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month, and support community journalism!
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
For just $5.25 per month, you can keep reading SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile, and support community journalism!
Already a subscriber?

Editorial: Troubled times for Hanna Boys Center

It should also be acknowledged that institutions that cater to at-risk kids are inherently more susceptible to such violations of client trust – harbors for the vulnerable are natural magnets for predators and opportunists.

Which is why it’s imperative that Hanna confront its flaws with transparency not only to the courts, but to the court of public opinion; this transparency calls for both an open mind, and an open heart.

Hanna describes itself as having been a “haven for hope” for troubled youth since opening its doors in Menlo Park in 1945 and, more locally, breaking ground in Sonoma Valley in 1948. In the years and decades since, it has literally helped thousands of boys from troubled circumstances safely tread the delicate teen years toward fulfilling, responsible and happy adult lives. It’s one of the reasons its support in the Valley is so prodigious.

Longtime Hanna regent James Lynch wrote in an op-ed in the I-T last year that the boys center’s 70-plus years of invaluable service to local youth shouldn’t be overlooked, especially at a time when the state grapples with its fate following the recent allegations.

The Index-Tribune agrees and we firmly hope Hanna will right its ship, and weather this storm. Its seven decades of “hope” shouldn’t be erased by these recent instances of despair.

As Lynch wrote: “Hanna’s healing mission is built on a foundation of redemption, hope and trust. Violating the central code of honor and respect between residents and staff goes against everything Hanna stands for.”

And for supporters, alumni, families and the boys it serves, the time is now for Hanna to show everything it stands for once again.

– Jason Walsh, editor

– John Burns, publisher