While many Sonoma election watchers were keeping a keen eye on the city council race, several other local campaigns and measures were decided Nov. 6 as well.

Michael Mainardi, a retired physician, led the field of three candidates vying for two seats on the Sonoma Valley Healthcare District Board with 48 percent of the vote. With 47 of 64 precincts reporting, incumbent Joshua Rymer looked a safe bet to hold his seat on the board with 35 percent. First-time challenger Douglas Ghiselin had 18 percent.

For the El Verano area seat on the Sonoma Valley Unified School District board of trustees, Cathy Coleman earned about 68 percent of the vote to Omar Paz Jr’s 32 percent.

The other education-focused race in the Sonoma Valley this election was for the Valley seat on the Santa Rosa Junior College Board of Trustees, in which incumbent Jeff Kunde earned 68 percent of the vote to challenger – and current Sonoma Valley School Board member – John Kelly’s 32 percent.

In what could be the only local upset of an incumbent candidate in the Valley this election, challenger Steve Rogers narrowly led the field of four candidates vying for two seats on the Valley of the Moon Water District Board with 27 percent of the vote – a 38 vote lead – over incumbent Jon Foreman’s 26 percent. With 16 of 23 precincts reporting at press time, incumbent Mark Heneveld was third with 25 percent, with challenger Dale Edward Ingraham trailing with 21 percent.

Valley voters were split on a trio of fire department parcel taxes, each needing two-thirds approval to pass, with revenues going to fund local fire departments. Measure X in the Schell-Vista Fire District and Measure T in the Glen Ellen Fire District were passing with 73 percent and 72 percent, respectively, with more than half of their precincts reporting. Measure Y, however, in the Valley of the Moon Fire District, was shy of its two-thirds approval with 64 percent of the vote with 16 of 23 precincts reporting.

Rounding out the local measures, the county’s Measure M one-eighth cent sales tax to fund county and city parks had earned 69 percent, with 355 of 551 precincts reporting. The measure needs two-third approval to pass.

More updates to come.