s
s
Sections
Sections
Subscribe
You've read 3 of 10 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month!
Already a subscriber?
You've read 6 of 10 free articles this month.
Get unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month!
Already a subscriber?
You've read all of your free articles this month.
Continue reading with unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month!
Already a subscriber?
We've got a special deal for readers like you.
Get unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month, and support community journalism!
Already a subscriber?
Thanks for reading! Why not subscribe?
Get unlimited access to SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile app for just $5.25 per month, and support community journalism!
Already a subscriber?
Want to keep reading? Subscribe today!
For just $5.25 per month, you can keep reading SonomaNews.com, the Sonoma Index-Tribune eEdition and our mobile, and support community journalism!
Already a subscriber?

The Spill: Wine news in Sonoma, April 6

X

The "Follow This Story" feature will notify you when any articles related to this story are posted.

When you follow a story, the next time a related article is published — it could be days, weeks or months — you'll receive an email informing you of the update.

If you no longer want to follow a story, click the "Unfollow" link on that story. There's also an "Unfollow" link in every email notification we send you.

This tool is available only to subscribers; please make sure you're logged in if you want to follow a story.

Login

X

Please note: This feature is available only to subscribers; make sure you're logged in if you want to follow a story.

LoginSubscribe

Wine and Its Effect on Your Teeth

With the amount of vino being consumed in Sonoma by wine lovers near and far, wine — white, rosé and red – does make an impact on the health of your pearly whites.

According to Wine Spectator, research shows that red wine is the biggest culprit when it comes to affecting dental health. First, there’s the obvious cosmetic concerns — purple staining can cause embarrassment when you’re at a wine tasting or just drinking with friends and family. Red wine contains a concentrated amount of chromogens – pigment-producing substances that stick to the teeth enamel and cause temporary staining in the short term, but can also discolor teeth in the long run. In addition, red wine contains acid causing tooth enamel erosion.

But white wine is no better. Although it doesn’t contain the pigment that red wines have, and are the reason for staining teeth, white wines usually hold a higher-than-red acidity that can break down enamel and make teeth more vulnerable to decay.

But there’s hope. To get the stains off with either wine, just quickly swish your mouth with water which stimulates saliva flow. Also, brushing beforehand actually helps more, than brushing after a good glass (or bottle).

Recently, a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry revealed that red-wine antioxidants prevented plaque-causing bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. Other studies showed that wine might prevent periodontal disease and tooth loss, and that red and white wine might assist in the prevention of streptococci, a type of bacteria associated with cavities, tooth erosion and sore throats.

If you love to indulge in a good glass of wine or two, or three — red or white, fear not. The doctors say that if you engage in effective and consistent oral habits such as brushing your teeth twice a day, flossing every day, eating healthy, and seeing your dentist on a regular basis, you have nothing to worry about.

Of course, there’s always abstinence, but what’s the fun in that?

Pinot Noir: Is it really the healthiest wine to drink?

According to the Hartford Courant, columnist Holly Van Hare shares the reasons why pinot noir is considered the healthiest wine.

Putting consumption amounts aside (because it’s never healthy to drink too much), yes, the type of wine matters when making healthier choices. Most people know that red wine, in general, is healthier compared to white or sparkling. But not all red wines are the same, and grapes contain different nutrients with varying sugar levels.

The Hartford Courant consulted a few sommeliers to learn which red wines are really the healthiest. Red wine is healthier mainly due to its antioxidants.

“Pinot noir has the highest concentration of the highly touted antioxidant resveratrol,” Benjamin Appleby, top sommelier at Abe & Louie’s in Boston, told Van Hare. “It is pretty easy to make the case for pinot noir being the healthiest choice among red wines.”

Resveratrol has been associated with lower risks of cancer, stroke, and heart disease, among other benefits. But resveratrol wasn’t the only reason for picking pinot noir over other red varietals.

“Although virtually all red wines have almost no residual sugar, pinot noir typically has a lower initial sugar level before fermentation, resulting in a wine with less alcohol and fewer calories than, say, your average cabernet,” Appleby said. “Finally, with its thin skin, pinot noir has fewer tannins which, while they may have some health benefits of their own, can cause trouble for those susceptible to heartburn.”

Pinot noir may not cure all your ailments, but it appears to be the best choice, paired with a healthy homecooked meal.

Up next: Signature Sonoma Valley

The second annual Signature Sonoma Valley wine event is this weekend, put on by the Sonoma Valley Vintners & Growers Alliance. In addition to winemaker lunches and dinners throughout the weekend, new this year is “The Hub,” a pop-up lounge for guests located at the Lodge. At 6 p.m. on Friday, April 6, the Icon event will feature 30 vintners pouring at Ram’s Gate Winery. At 10 a.m. on Sunday, the Bubble + Brunch event will take place will take place at the Hub. sonomavalleywine.com.

Send wine news to businessnews@sonomanews.com.