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No large hotels until pigs fly

<strong> By Thomas M. Jones </strong>

The Measure B ballot submission includes the statement that “No new large hotel over 25 rooms, and no expansion of an existing hotel to exceed a total of 25 rooms, shall be permitted unless Sonoma’s annualized hotel room occupancy rate exceeds 80 percent.”

In all of the letters and debates, I have seen no one dispute the finding that Sonoma’s annualized hotel room occupancy rate for hotels has never exceeded 80 percent. Therefore, Measure B could have simply stated, “No new large hotel over 25 rooms, and no expansion of an existing hotel to exceed a total of 25 rooms, shall be permitted unless pigs fly.” Stating Measure B in such clear terms will then provide a path for regulating any and all business development in ways that will preserve Sonoma’s small-town character and quality of life. For example, I dined out recently at one of my favorite Sonoma restaurants, and it occurred to me that much of the restaurant’s charm arises from its size. Smaller restaurants are so obviously more intimate and so much more in harmony with the small-town character of Sonoma that I am thinking seriously about how to preserve my vision of Sonoma’s charm. An “unless pigs fly” measure would be so much more honest than some convoluted measure like, “No new large restaurant with a seating capacity for over 40 patrons, and no expansion of an existing restaurant to exceed a total of 40 patron concurrent occupancy, shall be permitted unless Sonoma’s annualized restaurant concurrent patron occupancy rate exceeds 80 percent.”

Rather, we could have the simplified version that would read, “No new large restaurant with a seating capacity for over 40 patrons, and no expansion of an existing restaurant to exceed a total of 40 patron concurrent occupancy, shall be permitted unless pigs fly.” This measure would then relieve all of us from worrying about more large restaurants. Since we will all soon learn to just focus on large, we can skip over the cumbersome articulations of what constitutes large for any business development initiative, and realize that large is shorthand for “bigger than I want.” Thus, it will be important to constantly reference large (or big) when speaking in favor of such new measures.

In fact, we can see how the entire process for regulating business development can be streamlined by providing templates along the lines of “No new large ( name of type of business), and no expansion of a (type of business name) to a large size, shall be permitted unless pigs fly.”


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