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'BODYworks' sculpture display at Cornerstone

A New Leaf Gallery/Sculpturesite at Cornerstone Sonoma will open the exhibition “BODYworks,” on Sunday, Oct. 6, with a reception from 2 to 4 p.m. The work will be in display through Dec. 22.

BODYworks showcases recent figurative sculpture in wood, ceramic, bronze, resin, concrete and steel by 10 sculptors. Featured artists include Emil Alzamora, Dina Angel-Wing, Curt Brill, Tyler Burton, Mark Chatterley, Carole Feuerman, Frances Semple, Peter Schifrin, Carol Schwartz and Judith Stewart.

Stewart will bring three bronzes and one major clay work. After receiving her bachelor’s of fine arts from Syracuse University and her master’s from the University of Illinois, Stewart turned to sculpture. In her work, Stewart appears to follow a very deliberate process to decide when to use detailed likeness and where to let features fall away, yet she describes her intense collaboration with the material in these comments about clay: “It is uniquely responsive while being handled, offering up wonderful happenings which are impossible to plan or anticipate.  It seems a generous partner in art making.”

New York-based Feuerman is widely recognized as one of the world’s most prominent hyperrealist sculptors. Her humanistic figurative sculptures are in many important public and private collections worldwide and have shown at major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the State Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the Palazzo Strozzi in Florence, Italy. In this recent piece from her Swimmer series, “Balance Bust,” Feuerman began with a life cast of a model, which she reproduced in resin and painted with dozens of layers of oil paint to achieve much more than the true color of flesh: the very impression of its presence.

Architect-turned-sculptor Schwartz will bring two new portraits of children carved from laminated pieces of wood. Their polychromatic, textured surfaces exude a vibrant energy while their expression is soft and pensive. Schwartz said, “When I began sculpting, I wanted to depart from geometric forms and use soft materials to explore the human figure. I quickly realized that I missed building. I now use drawing and building techniques that are familiar to me. My work is a continuous process of adding and taking away, and acts as a metaphor for our growth as human beings.”


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